EREY-EN-c

West Bay Rotary Goal is
100% Participation
for 2015-2016 Year

 

 
Club Executives & Directors
President
President Elect
Secretary
Treasurer
Club Services / VP Elect
Rotary Foundation
Membership
 
 
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Applications Due
April 1, 2017
Oct 1, 2017
 
 
 
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Rotary Information
Member spotlight: The power of the press
When Teguest Yilma helped found the Rotary Club of Addis Ababa Entoto in 2002, she thought polio had already been eradicated from most of the world. But while Ethiopia had been free of the disease, Yilma was shocked to learn that new cases had started cropping up in surrounding countries such as Somalia. “I was thinking, it’s not possible, we can’t be free if the countries around us are not free,” she says. Yilma, the managing editor of Capital, Ethiopia’s largest English weekly newspaper, has brought a journalist’s skills to the fight against polio. She became vice chair of the Ethiopia...
Member interview: Writer sheds light on FDR’s right-hand woman
Battling breast cancer in 2000, Kathryn Smith found comfort pursuing her lifelong interest in Franklin D. Roosevelt. The more she read, the more intrigued she became with the 32nd U.S. president’s private secretary, Marguerite Alice “Missy” LeHand. “I thought, what a fascinating life she had because she was by his side through the polio crisis, establishing the polio rehabilitation center in Warm Springs and then after his return to politics,” she says. Smith, a past president of the Rotary Club of Greater Anderson, S.C., and a longtime newspaper journalist, turned that curiosity into a book...
Convention: Southern hospitality
The Atlanta Host Organization Committee is offering some good old-fashioned Southern hospitality at the Rotary International Convention from 10 to 14 June. It has planned a wide range of activities featuring everything from good food and music to inspiring tours of local landmarks. If it’s your first convention, these events are chances to meet fellow Rotarians from around the world, and if you’re an experienced convention goer, you can catch up with old friends. Hall of Fame baseball player Hank Aaron will host Rotarians for a “Strike Out Polio” night at the new SunTrust Park, where you’ll...
The Rotarian Conversation with Ban Ki-moon
One of United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s earliest memories is of fleeing with his family into the mountains during the Korean War, his village burning behind him. His father and grandfather had to forage for food in the woods; his mother gave birth to his siblings away from anything remotely resembling a health facility. “I have known hunger,” he says. “I have known war, and I have known what it means to be forced to flee conflict.” The soldiers who came to their rescue were flying the blue flag of the United Nations. The UN provided them with food and their schools with books....
Culture: Life in the bike lane
Like a lot of us, I spent much of my childhood riding bikes, but fell out of the habit for a while. Forty years. Then my wife and I moved to New York, where cyclists risk their necks in a daily Thunderdome of cabs, police cars, firetrucks, double-decker buses, messengers on motorbikes, and delivery trucks backing around corners at 20 miles an hour. Not for me! At least not until my 50th birthday, when my metabolic furnace flamed out. Calories started going directly from beer bottle to beer belly. It was time to start exercising. Either that or give up Samuel Adams, and I couldn’t do that to...
 
Welcome to West Bay Rotary

"Be a Gift to the World"

We meet Thursdays at 7:30 AM
First Congregational Church
55 Elm Street
Mailing address is PO Box 1033
Camden, ME  04843
United States
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District Site
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Upcoming Events
 
Weekly Speaker
West Bay Rotary - February 2, 2017
 
Immigrants & Farmworkers in Downeast Maine
Mano en Mano
 
Ian Yaffe – Director
Founded in 2005 in Milbridge, ME
 
Goals from Mano en Mano's 2017-2020 Strategic Plan:
  1. Support immigration in Downeast Maine.

  2. Ensure access to language services and increase affordable housing.

  3. Increase educational and economic opportunity.

  4. Foster community leadership, social justice, and equity.

  5. Build organizational and financial capacity to achieve Mano en Mano’s goals

Communities Served

Mano en Mano serves the communities of Milbridge and greater Washington County including this residential population of former migrant farmworkers and their families.

​Seasonally - workers enter the community to do the following agricultural work.

Blueberries
Broccoli
Seafood processing
Tipping/wreaths
 
83% latino
4% white
4% Native American
2% Asian
 
Consider this community to be their permanent home.
45% from Mexico
43% from the US
 
$15-25,000 – household income bracket – live at or below the poverty line.
Has been solid economic growth in the last 5 years
 
Starting in the early 1990’s the town of Milbridge experienced a rapid influx of migrant farmworkers who decided to leave the “migrant stream” and settle in Downeast Maine. For many families, a lack of available and affordable housing limits one's ability to put down roots in the area. Mano en Mano worked to build Hand in Hand Apartments to address this need.
 
Provide access to essential services
Interpretation
Job search
Medical services
Referrals to other organizations – food pantries, etc.
 
Do not provide direct assistance beyond the housing assistance.
We match folks with the systems & services that exist.
 
2 barriers – language barriers & cultural barrier
 
Access to essential services was not enough on its own
Voice in the community
Community Workshops
Voting rights
Men's health
 
Largest program
Maine Department of Ed
Migrant education statewide
 
300 migrant children statewide
Provide support & instructional services
 
Increases significantly in the summer – during the blueberry harvest
 
Some national data on the role immigrants in the community – there wasn’t anything specific to rural Maine.  They partnered with Colby to design & develop and econ impact study – collected over 255 data points from over 80 households.  Colby is crunching the data
 
Direct & econ impact & direct jobs supported.
 
How do you multiply this data out to some representative samples.
 
1.5 million in direct & indirect econ activity
There isn’t a solution to the workforce issue in Maine
 
Maine is not a destination state from people moving within the US
Immigrants may be the only answer for rural Maine
Important piece of our economic strategy.
 
Q&A
Are there groups around here that you help?
Some of the blueberry workers here in the Midcoast
Also work with the state on the migrant education – have to be under 22
 
There’s no easy transition from a temporary visa to a more permanent status
 
Has the move toward mechanical harvesting
Piece rate went up recently – increased pay because hand crews in very difficult terrain.
Don’t have the opportunity to gather as many boxes
550-750 here for the blueberry harvest
 
How many new immigrants are you seeing per year?
A couple of families per year – not something where there is a lot of fluctuation in/out
 
Finding a way to help people transition into housing is pretty difficult
 
What are the families telling you?
What’s the attraction? How can we leverage
Economic opportunity – not just Mexico
Like that it’s a small town, its safe, schools good & the community is welcoming and there are services available.  There is an anchor employer – seafood processing
 
How much integration is there with the community?
Schools are 25-30% latino
 
How did the community respond to the influx in immigrants?
The town was pretty proactive about it.  The community needed to figure out how to communicate with each other.  A lot of benefit for the community to having stable population.  Overall it has been a pretty welcoming community.
 
Buckets on the table
Ken will decide who the money goes to
 
Toboggan
We need parking assistance
Chili – 7 chili vendors – would like 1 more
Upstairs at Seadog
 
Sponsorships – could use 2-3 more
$50 or $100
 
West Bay Rotary
January 26, 2017
 
Scott Boucher - Bangor Rotary
Polio Plus / Rotary Foundation
 
Chair of Polio Plus charged with sharing info about the work of rotarians against polio
 
In 1985 Rotary launched Polio Plus – an initiative to immunize children
$1.5 billion toward a polio free world
2.5 children immunized
 
Currently Polio is endemic in 3 countries Afghanistan, Nigeria and Pakistan
Follow “End Polio Now” on Facebook for updates
 
It was considered impossible for India to be Polio Free – it has been 6 years since there was a case in India.
 
2016 - 35 cases
2015 – 74 cases
2014 – 359 cases
2013 – 416 cases
 
Change in the vaccination – focuses on types 1 & 3
The World Health Organization believes that Polio can be eradicated in the next 12 months.
 
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation supports through matching gifts
Dollars matched 2 for 1 – your $25 gift is matched with $50 from Bill & Melinda Gates
 
October 24 – World Polio Day
 
Purple Pinkie Project
When a child is immunized in a developing country they get their pinkie painted purple to indicate that they received an immunization.
 
Miles to end Polio
50% match of dollars donated
Our district paid $25,000 then matched by Bill & Melinda + match for Miles end our donation became $112,000.
 
Rotary Direct
Rotarian Magazine – ID # is at the top of your mailing label
Can also give to education, clean water, etc.
 
Foundation for Rotary is celebrating its 100 anniversary
$26.50 founding donation – it would be great if all rotarians would donate $26.50 to the foundation for the anniversary
 
Feb 9 – Old Town
Mike McGovern, Chair for Polio Plus World Wide
Travels in Iceland with Dan Bookham
West Bay Rotary
January 12, 2017
 
Peggy Smith from Center for Non-Violent Communication introduced Alton Lane
She met Mr. Lane when he was in the re-entry center in Belfast after being incarcerated.
He has used non-violent communication to re-frame his life.
 
Alton Lane
 
Abused from age 5-12 which made him an angry & hateful person
This caused him to shut down his emotions and he was living on the street by the time he was 12.
 
He didn’t have a supportive family life & he started using drugs & felt accepted by this group of people.  All he wanted was love and there was no emotional connection – He was taught that men don’t express emotions or say I love you.  If people got to close he created violent situations to protect himself.
 
When he was 17 years old he was going to have his first child.  Child wasn’t born yet and he hated her. His parents had changed their lives and found god and he went to them for help.  He was afraid that if he had a daughter she would become him.  His parents raised her – they don’t have a relationship.  Had a son at 18 – named after him, acts like him and he hated him.  The hate was to protect him from caring about him.  He was drinking at doing drugs every day.  At 21 -  he was in a bar and someone sucker punched him and he ran him over in the street & he felt no remorse. He felt like he had to hate everyone and really hated himself too.
 
He went to prison for running the man over.  Took 9-10 classes – after a few months he was back to his old ways and believed that he didn’t deserve happiness. – he pushed everyone away.
 
He met Rhonda – they’ve been together 11 years – has happiness.  He allowed himself to open up & feel.  Her children call him dad.  They say he’s not a bad person & they love him. 
 
Never had a license – got pulled over, went to the Maine Coast re-entry center.  He convinced himself that it wasn’t going to work.
 
While in the program he went to the non-violent communication class.  Thought Peggy was crazy.  A couple of classes in, he started to connect to his feelings and he asked Peggy if it was okay to have all of these feelings.  Connected these feelings to needs – were those needs okay? 
 
In 2009 both of his parents died.  Dad asked him not to get drunk & hurt people.  He got high and hurt himself.  He didn’t want to live – he wanted to die;  he never had the courage to pull the trigger.  Today he enjoys helping people. He couldn’t believe when his sisters told them that they were proud of him. 
 
Went to work at the jail – his sister’s boyfriend was in jail for aggravated assault against his sister.  He didn’t hurt him – he walked off.  His sister never told him that it happened.  He called his sister a couple days later – they didn’t want to tell him because they were afraid that he would have a violent reaction and they didn’t want to lose him. 
 
If we change our thought process – we can change our behavior.  He never patted himself on the back for his successes, but he feels pretty good about himself. 
 
He quit all chemicals.
 
Q&A
Is there a single thing that you want us to walk away with?
Change is possible – people can change
 
Is there anything that we can do?
Show each other love.   Learning to love people that we disagree with.  Know that there is a way to learn
 
How did you get support for yourself when you were beginning to feel your emotions?
He would talk to Peggy a lot. 
 
Was there an a-ha moment?
When his family started to reflect unconditional love.  Having the feeling of goodness that he had from being a part of the family.  The moment he realized he thought his family was awesome and he never wanted to lose them.
 
Did you go to re-hab or detox in jail?
He de-toxed at home alone.  It wasn’t nice. 
 
How did the book happen?
Only Human – Alton Lane
Originally it was just a manuscript to get the chatter out of his head. 
 
Where else are you speaking?
Maine counseling association
Riverview psychiatric
Working on getting into the schools – it’s difficult to get into the schools.
 
 
 
Greeters
 
February
  February 2  Linda Payson
  February 9  Sarah Ruef-Lindquist
  February 16  Suzanne Scott
  February 23  Richard Groff
 
March
  March 2  Mike Pierce
  March 9  Joan LeMole
 
 
 
 

Committee Meeting Dates, Times and Location

(For complete committee contact information check your weekly bulletin
Community Service
Mark Coursey 
mark@camdenlaw.com, 
Mark Masterson
dmmasterson@hotmail.com
2nd Wednesday held Monthly
Quarry Hill Dining Area
7:30 am
 
Rotary Youth Exchange
George Forristall
george@forocean.com or
Heidi Karod 
hkarod@gmail.com
4th Wednesday held Monthly
Congregational Church Parlor
7 AM
 
International Committee
Susan Dorr  
SusanDorr@gmail.com
4th  Wednesday held Monthly
Congregational Church Parlor
8:00 AM
 
Vocational Committee
Jim Potter 
PotterandAssoc@AOL.com
meetings held as necessary
 
Public Relations Committee
Jen Harris
jeniferharris@comcast.net
no meetings
take turns reporting meeting,
press releases 
and publishing bulletin
 
Membership Committee
Chair: Lisa Dresser
mrstkd@gmail.com
meets as necessary
 
 
 
West Bay Board Meeting
West Bay Board Meeting
1st Wednesday Monthly
Quarry Hill Dining Room
7AM Breakfast Available
 
ENDPOLIONOW_4p
 
 
Any Breakfast Suggestions, or Favorites?
 
Please e-mail Lisa at: LSojka@fullerautomall.com

 
 

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Birthdays & Anniversaries
Member Birthdays:
  • Heidi Karod
    February 3
  • Leamon Scott
    February 3
  • Bob Stiehler
    February 14
  • Ray Fink
    February 18
  • Kristen Lindquist
    February 20
Anniversaries:
  • George Abendroth
    February 18
Join Date:
  • Ray Fink
    February 1, 2013
    4 years
  • Lisa Dresser
    February 2, 2012
    5 years
  • Deborah Fink
    February 18, 2015
    2 years
  • George Abendroth
    February 18, 2016
    1 year
  • Jodie Heal
    February 18, 2016
    1 year
  • Ira Mandel
    February 22, 2012
    5 years
  • Laura Evans
    February 27, 1997
    20 years
  • ROBERTA SMITH
    February 28, 2003
    14 years